Knitting 101: More Increases and Decreases

So in our last lesson, we got the chance to look at basic increase and a basic decrease. In this post, we’re going to go over a few more stitches that will allow us to increase and decrease in different ways. I’ve included our stitches from last lesson here as well so you guys have them all in one place. Keep in mind, this is NOT an exhaustive list and everything that has a knit version probably ALSO has a purl version you can do. I am going to hit the ones you will see most here. If you would like to see how to do an increase or decrease that is NOT covered here, please contact me so I can get it added on here or help you out (or both).

Increases

Left Leaning Increases

Make One Left(M1L)

Find the space between the stitch you just made and the next stitch to work. Lift up the string between the two stitches from front to back (if it helps think that when someone has “left” they go away from you). Then knit through the back side of the loop you’ve just made.

Left Lifted Increase (LLI) aka Knit Left Loop (kll)

Knit your stitch, then lift the left side of the stitch below the stitch you just worked. Knit that stitch as well.

Knit Front Back  (kfb)

Knit the stitch like normal, but before you slide the knitted loop off the main needle, knit through the back loop of the same stitch.

Make One Toward (M1T)

Basically for this increase, you’re casting on a stitch and then moving on to the next knit stitch. Make a loop with your working yarn by laying the part closest to your work over the part closer to the ball (this can be more practically done by wrapping the string around a finger, but is harder to see in photos). Twist the loop slightly and slip it onto your working needle and move onto the next stitch.

Right Leaning Increases

Make One Right(M1R)

Find the space between the stitch you just made and the next stitch to work. Lift up the string between the two stitches from back to front (if it helps think that when someone is coming toward you they’re coming “right” at you). Then knit the loop you’ve just made like normal.

Right Lifted Increase (rli) aka Knit Right Loop (krl)

Lift the right side of the stitch below the stitch you that is next on your main needle. Place the lifted loop onto your main needle and knit that stitch, then knit the next stitch  as well.

Purl Front Back (pfb)

Purling the front and back is basically the same thing as knitting the front and back, but you do it on the purl side instead. Purl your stitch like normal, but before you slide the stitch off you main needle, purl the back loop of the stitch as well.

Make One Away (M1A)

Basically for this increase, you’re casting on a stitch and then moving on to the next knit stitch. Make a loop with your working yarn by laying the part closes to your ball over the part closer to your work (this can be more practically done by wrapping the string around a finger, but is harder to see in photos). Slip the loop onto your working needle and move onto the next stitch.

Neutral Increases

Yarn Over (yo)

To Yarn over, you simply wrap your yarn around your working needle (the one you’re moving your freshly worked stitches on to) in a counter clockwise (ALWAYS COUNTER CLOCKWISE) direction.

yarn-over

Yarn Forward Round Needle (yfrn)

Alright you guys, you know my thing about “always counter clockwise?” This is one of the few times that it actually doesn’t apply.  This is usually used when increasing between knit and purl stitches or between two purls. Wrap the yarn clockwise all the way around your needle and then purl your next stitch.

Decreases

Left Leaning Decreases

Slip Slip Knit (ssk)

This is a fairly standard counter weight for the k2tog below. To make a slip slip knit, insert your working needle into the loop on your main needle as if to knit, then slide the loop to your working needle. Do that one more time so you have two unworked loops on your working needle. Now insert your main needle back into the stitches and knit the two together like normal.

Slip Slip Purl (ssp)

Slip Slip purl is the “wrong side” version of the slip slip knit and is worked virtually the same way. To make a slip slip purl, insert your working needle into the loop on your main needle as if to purl, then slide the loop to your working needle. Do that one more time so you have two unworked loops on your working needle. Now insert your main needle back into the stitches and purl the two together like normal.

Knit Two Together Through the Back Loops (k2 tog tbl)

This is worked the same as k2 tog below, but you’ll be working the back loops of the stitch rather than knitting them normally. Insert your working needle through the back loop of TWO stitches from your main needle. Then knit.

Slip One, Knit One, Pass Slipped Stitch over (sl 1, k1, psso)

This one is actually not in use much anymore. It has the same result as slip slip knit (and you can substitute ssk if you would rather in patterns that call for it), but you’ll see it in some older patterns so I am going to cover it here just so you know what it means. Slip one as if to knit the stitch, but just leave it on your working needle for the moment. Knit the next loop on your main needle. Then pick up the stitch you slipped to your working needle with your main needle and gently pull it over the stitch you just knitted and off the needles.

Slip Slip Slip Knit (sssk)

I’m guessing your so smart, you already know where this one is going. Just like the ssk, To make a slip, slip, slip knit, insert your working needle into the loop on your main needle as if to knit, then slide the loop to your working needle. Do that two more times so you have three unworked loops on your working needle. Now insert your main needle back into the stitches and knit the three together.

Slip Slip Slip Purl (sssp)

Just like above, this is the “wrong side” version of the slip slip slip knit. To make a slip,  slip, slip, purl, insert your working needle into the loop on your main needle as if to purl, then slide the loop to your working needle. Do that two more times so you have three unworked loops on your working needle. Now insert your main needle back into the stitches and purl the three together.

Slip One, Knit Two Together, Pass Slipped Stitch Over (sl 1, k2tog, psso)

This is very similar to the sl1, k1, psso but we’ll be knitting two together in the middle. Slip one as if to knit the stitch, but just leave it on your working needle for the moment. Knit the next two loops on your main needle together (exactly like k2 tog below). Then pick up the stitch you slipped to your working needle with your main needle and gently pull it over the stitch you just knitted and off the needles (exactly like the sl 1, k1, psso above)

Right Leaning Decreases

Knit Two Together (k2 tog)

You’ll remember from last lesson that knitting two together was really as simple as is sounded. Slide your working needle into two loops on your main needle and knit them as though they are one stitch.

Purl Two Together (p2 tog)

You’ll remember from last lesson that purling two together was basically the same as knitting two together, just with purls. Slide your working needle into two loops on your main needle and purl them as though they are one stitch.

Knit Three Together (k3 tog)

If you thought knitting two together was easy, wait till we knit THREE together. Seriously, it’s the same thing, just slide your working needle into three loops on  you main needle and knit as though they are one.

Purl Three Together (p3 tog)

And You guessed it! This is the same as knitting three together, but we’re using purls. Slide your working needle through three loops on your main needle and purl as one.

Neutral Decreases

Centered Double Decrease (cdd) aka slip two, knit one, pass two slipped stitches over (s2kp2)

Last, but certainly not least on our list is the unique centered double decrease. This stitch is unique because it is the only decrease (that I am aware of anyway) that doesn’t lean one way or the other. In order to make this stitch, we’ll slip two stitches kintwise onto our working needle (just like we did for ssk above) then knit the next stitch on the working needle. You’ll have three loops on your working needle now. The final step is to lift BOTH slipped stitches over the knit stitch and off the needles.

 

Advertisements

One thought on “Knitting 101: More Increases and Decreases

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s