H is for Horseshoe Crab

If you read my last post on the Crochet Blog, you know that I’m working on motivating everyone to get ready for the beach, so today H is for Horseshoe Crab Stitch!

What Is It?

First off, what the heck is a horseshoe crab? A horseshoe crab is a crab that sort of looks like a stingray, they have a very hard outer shell and look like the little critter from “Alien” if you flip them over (I’ll spare you the creepy side photo) :

horseshoecrab-main

Horseshoe Crab Stitch is technically a lace stitch that makes a pattern like several of these chasing each other up the work.

To begin, cast on any multiple of 12 stitches plus 3. I’ll be working 27 today.

cast on 27

Rows one and three use the “PSSO” or pass slipped stitch over technique quite often so I’m going to pause here to review that decrease. The instructions read “slip one, knit two together, pass slipped stitch over.” So to begin the decrease, slip the stitch in question:

sl1k2-tog-psso-slip

Then knit two together.

Then pass the stitch you slipped OVER the stitch that you just completed (the one that knit two together):

sl1k1psso

And you’re done with the slip one, knit two together, pass slipped stitch over! On to row one.

Knit one, knit two together and draw the yarn over (increase). Then knit two, yarn over (increase), knit one, slip one, knit two together, pass the slipped stitch over, knit one, yarn over, knit two yarn over, slip one, knit two together, pass the slipped stitch over, yarn over and repeat from “then” until you’re at the last twelve stitches (also take a big breath if you tried to read that sentence aloud). For the last twelve stitches, knit two, yarn over, knit one, slip one, knit two together, pass the slipped stitch over, knit one, yarn over, knit two, slip one, knit one, pass the slipped stitch over, knit one and you’re done (take another big breath after that one)!

row 1 crab

Row two is much simpler. Just purl across. (For those of you who noticed my multicolored needles here, I’ll go on a short tangent: They’re both size 8, but I couldn’t find the partners to either set. Working with two different material needles is not ideal, but for a sample it won’t hurt anything. I would not advise it for a big project, but if you’re in a pinch, it works.)

row 2 crab

Row three runs in similar fashion to row one, but not quite as complicated. Knit one, knit two together and yarn over to start off. Then knit three, yarn over slip one, knit two together and pass the slipped stitch over, yarn over and repeat from the beginning of this sentence to the last six stitches. For the last six, knit three, yarn over, slip one, knit one, pass the slipped stitch over, knit one and that’s it!

row 3 crab

The fourth row is the same as the second, purl across.

row 4 crab

Now that you’ve gotten through all that, just repeat rows one through four until you have enough crabs for a low county boil (please don’t try to put real horseshoe crabs in your boil, there really isn’t much edible on them).

crabulous

What Else Can You Do With It?

There are SO many possibilities with this stitch! It would make a lovely scarf, throw, or baby blanket just by itself, but you can also integrate this as a panel into your favorite sweater pattern or use it as a sleeve. I think my favorite idea for this right now is to us it as the top of a flared sleeve (think medieval princess dress sleeve) with an English mesh from the elbow down. I’m not sure what exactly I would attach that to yet, but it’s just starting to brew, so you never know where you may see it pop up from here.

The Short Version

Cast on a multiple of 12 sts plus 3

Row 1: K1, k2tog, yo, *k2, yo, k1, sl 1, k2tog, psso, k1, yo, k2, yo, sl 1, k2tog, psso, yo; rep from * to last 12 sts, k2, yo, k1, sl 1, k2tog, psso, k1, yo, k2, yo, sl1, k1, psso, k1.

Row 2: Purl.

Row 3: K1, k2tog, yo, *k3, yo, sl 1-k2tog-psso, yo; rep from * to last 6 sts , k3, yo, sl1, k1, psso, k1.

Row 4: Purl.

Rep rows 1-4 until you’re done being crabby ūüėČ

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H is for Honeycomb Mesh

The Holidays are over and it’s time to get back on the right track so we can hit the beach in a few months. Let’s start our first post back with something fun and easy. Today, H is for Honeycomb Mesh.

What Is It?

Honeycomb mesh is an openwork or lace stitch that looks rather like a honeycomb. Depending on how you gauge it, the stitch can be very tightly woven or very open and loose. I’m going for something a little more open today so I’m using a worsted weight yarn and a N (10 mm hook) this is the same gauge that I use in the Nesting Baskets Pattern so this is a great chance to see how stitch and gauge work together to change how an item looks. Obviously something this open won’t be nearly as rigid as a basket.

Alright, time to get to work! First, chain a multiple of four plus ten. I think I’ll work with 22 today.

chain 22

Now, we’re going to skip nine stitches (three stitches are skipped, two count as a double crochet, and four count as your chain four). Double crochet in the 10th stitch and then chain four, skip three stitches and repeat that to the last stitch. Double crochet in the last stitch and you’re done with row one.

row 1

Chain seven to start row two (three count as he first dc and four as the chain four). Double crochet in the chain 4 space and then chain four repeat that to the last chain four space and double crochet in the last space. That’s row two done.

row 2

You can see that row two looks a little funky on the ends, but don’t worry! After a couple more rows the pattern starts to come out and it looks fine. Just repeat row two until you’re happy with the length and you’ll be good to go.

honeycomb mesh

Want to do increases? Just work the double crochet chain 4 repeat twice in the same chain 4 space. Want to decrease? Skip a chain four space.

What Else Can You Do With It?

If you read the post I did on Cane Stitch in the knitting blog, then you may have noticed already that this stitch is sort of the crochet equivalent. Which means all the things you can do with Cane Stitch you can ALSO do with Honeycomb Mesh to get a similar look.

In the same way as for Cane Stitch,  you would work three rows of garter and the beginning and end of the work to make blocks for easy sewing, with Honeycomb Mesh, you can work two rows of single crochets to make for easy sewing. You can also turn this into a panel by adding a double crochet or two at the sides.

For making clothes, you may want to use worsted weight and a K hook for a tighter weave, but just like Cane stitch, I like this look for a sweater, maybe a beach bag or overlay for a purse. This would also make a good vest or long beach cover up–if we have to get ready for the beach, may as well start with a crochet project to get you motivated right?

K (6.50mm) hook and worsted yarn:

mesh small

The Short Version

Chain a multiple of 4 + 10

Row 1: Skip 9 sts, *dc in next st, ch 4, skip 3 sts,* rep from * to last st, dc, turn.

Row 2: ch 7, *dc in ch 4 sp, ch 4,* rep from * to last ch 4 sp, dc, turn.

Repeat Row 2 until you don’t want to anymore.

New Year Review

I hope you all are having a lovely holiday with friends and family! My family and I are enjoying some time off together and getting over the yuck. When I was in school, we would always do reviews just before and just after “Winter Break,” so I thought now might be a good time to review what we’ve learned so far!

I also have a question for you all! Would you be interested in an e-book that you could download from my etsy or from amazon (on kindle) with all the stitches I post after this series is complete? It would have a range of patterns from dishcloths to sweaters and include all the pictures (maybe even nicer ones) that you’ve seen here in the blog.

Just a thought I’ve been toying with. Message me on etsy, facebook, or just contact me via email with your thoughts. You can leave a comment on this post too! Now, without further ado:

The A-G Knitting Stitch Guide

Andalusian The Short Version

andalusian

CO multiple of 2 plus 1

Row 1: K across

Row 2: P across

Row 3: *K1, P1, repeat from * to last st, K1

Row 4: P across

Repeat rows 1-4 ad infinitum or until you’re done.

Brioche The Short Version

brioche

WYIF = with yarn in front

BKS= Brioche knit stitch (knit yarn over and next st together)

Cast on any multiple of 2

Set up row: wyif, sl one purlwise, yo, kn1 across

Row 1: wyif, sl one purlwise, yo, bks across

Cane The Short Version

cane when done

Cast on a multiple of 3+4

Row 1: k2 *sl 1, k2tog, psso, (yo) twice rep from * to last 2 sts, k2

Row 2: k2 *p1, k1, p1 rep from * to last 2 sts k2

Row 3: knit across

Daisy The Short Version

finished daisy

Daisy Stitch

Cast on a multiple of 4 +1

Row 1: k across

Row 2: k1, *p3tog do not drop, yo p same 3 tog, k1 rep from *to end

Row 3: k across

Row 4: k1, p1, k1 * p3tog do not drop, yo p same 3 tog, k1 rep from *to last two sts, p1, k1

The BONUS Short Version

Drooping Elm Leaf Stitch

drooping elm leaf

 

Cast on a multiple of 15 sts + 1.

Row 1 : *k1, yo, k1, ssk, p1, k2tog, k1, yo, p1, ssk, p1, k2tog, yo, k1, yo; rep from * to end, k1.

Row 2: p1, *p4, k1, p1, k1, p3, k1, p4; rep from * to end

Row 3: *k1, yo, k1, ssk, p1, k2tog, k1, p1, sl 1, k2tog, psso, yo, k3, yo; rep from * to end, k1.

Row 4: p1, *p6, k1, p2, k1, p4; rep from *.

Row 5: *(k1, yo) twice, ssk, p1, (k2tog) twice, yo, k5, yo;rep from *, end k1.

Row 6: p1, *p7, k1, p1, k1, p5; rep from *.

Row 7: *k1, yo, k3, yo, sl 1, k2tog, psso, p1, yo, k1, ssk, p1, k2tog, k1, yo; rep from *, end k1.

Row 8: p1, *(p3, k1) twice, p7; rep from *.

Row 9: *k1, yo, k5, yo, ssk, k1, ssk, p1, k2tog, k1, yo; rep from *, end k1.

Row 10: p1, *p3, k1, p2, k1, p8; rep from *.

 English Mesh The Short Version

english mesh

Cast on a multiple of 6 + 1.

Row 1: p across

Row 2: *k1, yo, ssk, k1, k2tog, yo,  rep from * to last st, k1

Row 3: p across

Row 4: k1, *yo, k1, sl 1, k2tog, psso, k1, yo, k1, rep from * to end

Row 5: p across

Row 6: *k1, k2tog, yo, k1, yo, ssk,  rep from * to last st, k1

Row 7: p across

Row 8: k2tog, *(k1, yo) twice, k1, sl 1, k2tog, psso; rep from * to last 5 sts, (k1, yo) twice, k1, ssk.

Faun’s Eye The Short Version

Fauns Eye

Cast on a multiple of 12 sts + 1.

Row 1: k1, *ssk, k3, yo, k1, yo, k3, k2tog, k1; rep from * to end.

Row 2: p1, * p2tog, p2, yo, p3, yo, p2, p2tog tbl, p1; rep from * to the end of the row.

Row 3: k1, *ssk, k1, yo, k5, yo, k1, k2tog, k1; rep from * to the end of the row.

Row 4: p1, *yo, p2tog, p7, p2tog tbl, yo, p1; rep from * to the end of the row.

Row 5: k1, *yo, k3, k2tog, k1, ssk, k3, yo, k1; rep from * to the end of the row.

Row 6: p2, *yo, p2, p2tog, p1, p2tog tbl, p2, yo, p3; rep from *, to the last 12 sts, yo, p2, p2tog, p1, p2tog tbl, p2, yo, p2.

Row 7: k3, *yo, k1, k2tog, k1, ssk, k1, yo, k5; rep from *, to the last 12 sts, yo, k1, k2tog, k1, ssk, k1, yo, k3.

Row 8: p4, *p2tog tbl, yo, p1, yo, p2tog, p7; rep from *, to the last 12 sts, p2tog tbl, yo, p1, yo, p2tog, p4.

Garter Lace Ladders The Short Version

that was easy

Cast on a multiple of 4

Row 1: *k2tog, (yo) twice, ssk; rep from * to the end.

Row 2: *k1, (k1, p1) into double yo, k1; rep from * to the end.

Christmas Review

I hope you all are having a lovely holiday with friends and family! My family and I are enjoying some time off together and getting over the yuck. When I was in school, we would always do reviews just before and just after “Winter Break,” so I thought now might be a good time to review what we’ve learned so far!

I also have a question for you all! Would you be interested in an e-book that you could download from my etsy or from amazon (on kindle) with all the stitches I post after this series is complete? It would have a range of patterns from dishcloths to sweaters and include all the pictures (maybe even nicer ones) that you’ve seen here in the blog.

Just a thought I’ve been toying with. Message me on etsy, facebook, or just contact me via email with your thoughts. You can leave a comment on this post too! Now, without further ado:

The A-G Crochet Stitch Guide

 Astrakhan The Short Version

finished

Chain as many as you’d like

Row 1a: chain 3 (counts as 1st dc here and throughout), dc across. DO NOT TURN

Row 1b: Working left to right, chain 7. Sl st into FRONT loop of tr to the right. repeat across.

Row 2a: Working right to left, chain 3, dc in BACK loop of next dc across.

Row 2b: Working left to right, chain 7. Sl st into FRONT loop of dc to the right. repeat across.

Repeat rows 2a and 2b until work is finished.

Broomstick The Short Version

broomstick

Chain any multiple of 5

set up row: sc across

Row 1: With dowel in left hand, draw loop over dowel. *Using crochet hook, insert hook into next sc, YO, draw yarn through sc, and draw loop over dowel rep from * across

Row 2: With crochet hook, slip 5 loops from dowel, YO and draw through loops, ch 1. Sc 5 in center of loops, *slip 5 loops from dowel, sc 5 in center of loops, rep from * to end.

Repeat rows 1 and 2 until desired length is reached.

Crocodile The Short Versionfinished croc

Chain a multiple of 6+1

Row 1: chain 3 (counts as 1st dc), dc in 4th chain from hook, *chain 2, dc 2 in same chain rep from* across

Row 2: Chain 3 (counts as 1st dc) dc 4 around post of last dc on row 1, *ch 1 dc 5 around post of next dc on row 1, skip ch2, 2dc, ch2 rep from *across

Repeat rows 1 and 2 until you’re done.

Dew Drop The Short Version20171018_093311(0)

Special Stitches

  • Cluster: *yo, insert hook into stitch, draw yarn through stitch, yo draw through first 2 loops on hook rep from *3 times (4 loops on hook), yarn over, draw through all 4 loops

Chain Multiple of 4 +2

Row 1: ch 4 (counts as sc, ch 3), cluster, ch 1, skip 2 ch, 1 sc into next ch, *ch 3, cluster into next ch, ch 1, skip 2 ch, 1 sc into next ch, rep from * until last 2 sts, ch 2, dc into last ch, turn.

Row 2: Ch 4 (counts as sc, ch 3), cluster into first 2 ch space, ch 1, *sc into next 3 ch space, ch 3, cluster into same 3 ch space, ch 1, rep from * to last ch space, sc into last ch space, ch 2, 1dc into 4th chain in previous row, turn.

Repeat row 2 until you’ve reached the moon…or your desired length.

Eye Drop The Short Versioneyedrop stitch done

Pattern Stitch

Eye Drop: insert hook into exposed back loop, yo draw through, insert hook into next sc, yo draw through, yo draw through all three loops on hook.

Chain a multiple of 4+1

Set Up Rows

Row 1 (RS): ch 1 to turn, sc in each ch across.

Row 2 (WS): ch 2 (counts as 1st sc) *dc, tr in front loop, dc, sc rep from * across

Pattern Rows

Row 1 (RS): ch 1 to turn, sc in each ch across.

Row 2 (WS): Ch 4 (counts as 1st tr) dc *eye drop, dc, tr in front loop, dc rep from * to last stitch, tr in next sc.

Row 3: rep row 1

Row 4: ch 2 (counts as 1st sc

) dc, tr in front loop, dc, *eye drop, dc, tr in front loop, dc rep from * to last stitch, sc in next sc.

Repeat pattern rows 1-4 until desired length is reached.

Flag Stitch The Short Version

half cloth

Pattern Stitch

Flag Stitch (flg): yo twice, (insert hook into st, yo draw through loop, yo draw through 2 loops on hook) twice, (yo draw through two loops on hook) twice. Insert hook into previous two loops worked–not the two you JUST worked, but the two before those–yo draw through, yo draw through 2.

Chain any odd number

Row 1: sc across

Row 2: Ch 4 (counts as 1st tr) *flg in next st, sk 1 rep from *to last st, tr in last st

Repeat row 2 until desired length is reached.

Granule The Short Version

row 4 done

Pattern Stitch

Picot Single Crochet (Psc): insert hook into next st, yo, draw loop through, chain 3, yo, draw through both loops on hook.

Chain a multiple of 4

Row 1: ch 1, across, turn.

Row 2: ch 1, sc into first st, *Psc into next st, sc into next st; rep from * to end, turn.

Row 3: ch 1, sc into first and each st to end, turn.

Row 4: ch 1, sc into first 2 sts, *Psc into next st, sc into next st; rep from * to last st, sc into last st, turn.

repeat rows 1-4 until desired length is reached.

G is for Garter Lace Ladders

Lace, lace, lace! Aren’t you just SICK of it? I’m not actually, but I know that lace stitches can be a bear, so this post is for those of you who love lace but hate the ten row instructions that come with it. Today, G is for Garter Lace Ladders.

What is it?

Garter Lace Ladders is of course lace! It is probably the simplest lace in the knitting world and a great efficacy builder for knitters who are new to lace or just starting out in general.

To begin, cast on any multiple of four. I’ll work working with 20 today.

cast on lace

knitting-not-exercise

If we really DID live in a world where knitting made you skinny, I would consider this lace a warm up exercise.

I’m still assuming that you’ve ready through my post on Increases and Decreases (it’s basically essential to all lace) and as you start row one, you’ll see what I mean.

Knit two together (lean right), yarn over twice (neutral), Slip slip knit (lean left) across. So if you can imagine yourself (or perhaps your favorite person to look at instead) leaning to the right for a stretch, reaching up to the sky for a two count, and then leaning left for a stretch, you’ll have a new exercise to try out (after knitting of course) and a completed row one.

row 1

Row two didn’t quite spark the same image for me, but if row one was a warm up, this would have to be as well. Knit the first stitch, then knit one into¬† your first yarn over and purl one into your next yarn over. Knit the next stitch and then repeat. Since we’re on the exercise bend, this would be one of those weird paced walking things from 80’s aerobics tapes. Step, step, slide, step or something like that. Yeah, that was a bit odd…

Row 2

And now you know why I call this Natalie’s Oddities…and how to do that Garter Lace Ladder stitch.

that was easy

What Else Can You Do With It?

The Garter lace ladder stitch is the perfect stitch to practice tension and gauge on. Go with a very thin yarn (like a sock weight or thinner) and a very large needle (like a US 8/ 5.0mm) to get a more lacy look or use a thicker yarn (worsted weight or thicker) and a needle appropriate for the yarn your using (happens to be a US 8/ 5.0mm again) for a tighter look. I used a worsted weight yarn with a 6.0mm needle today.

This stitch makes a wonderful scarf, tablecloth or sweater panel. It also works well as part of a throw or place mat. If you like to make baskets, this would be a fun panel on the side of a basket as well.

The Short Version

Cast on a multiple of 4

Row 1: *k2tog, (yo) twice, ssk; rep from * to the end.

Row 2: *k1, (k1, p1) into double yo, k1; rep from * to the end.

G is for Granule

G could be for Granny squares, circles, hexagons, rectangles, or triangles, but I’ll leave Granny sippin’ sweet tea for now. Today, g is for Granule stitch.

What is it?

Granule stitch is the perfect textured stitch for a dishcloth or rug. It takes the chain three picot and turns it sideways to create a swatch with one textured size and one flat side.

To start, chain any multiple of four. I’ll do 20 today.

chain 20

Then, chain one to turn your work and single crochet across. I think we’ve covered this before, but just in case I missed it, that turning chain just hangs out. You don’t ever work a turning chain unless the instructions for your pattern tell you to.

sc across

Simple enough so far right? Chain one to turn and single crochet in the first single crochet to start row two. Then we’ll work a picot single crochet.

This stitch is really simple, basically it’s a single crochet with a chain three stick in the middle of it. First, insert your hook into the next stitch, yarn over and draw through the loop–just like starting a single crochet.

Then chain three, leaving one loop on the hook.

psc ch3

Finally, yarn over and draw through both loops on the hook, just like finishing your single crochet.

psc 4

And that’s a picot single crochet! Why is it called picot? Well a picot is commonly group of chain three that are usually joined together at the base. Like this:

picot

You’ve just made one of those (sort of) in the middle of your single crochet, so hopefully the name makes a little more sense.

To finish off row two, work single crochet, picot single crochet alternating until you reach the end. Make sure as you work that all of you picot single crochets are pointing the same direction, otherwise you’ll have texture on both sides, not just one.

Then chain one to turn and single crochet across. When you get to the picot single crochet, make sure you’re working in the stitch and NOT the chain three space. It should look like this:

the psc stitch top

Row four is the same as row two, but we’re offsetting the picot single crochets so that they make something of a lattice pattern rather than being in columns. To start, single crochet in the first TWO stitches, then alternate picot single crochet and single crochets across. End with a single crochet and you have the pattern done! Good job!

What Else Can You Do With It?

I already mentioned that I like this stitch for rugs or dishcloths, the picot single crochet gives a nice texture for scrubbing and usually feels softer on the feet (depending on the yarn used of course!). Granule stitch would also be a fun way to imitate wool on a sheep doll, the fluffy side of a baby blanket, or very short curly hair on a baby doll. Another good application would be the inside of socks.

If you were here for my Crochet Sock Tutorials, then you already know how I feel about crocheted socks, but I think adding a soft texture with the right yarn might just make me a believer in crochet socks as a good thing. I think I’ll have to try it out after the holiday season.

The Short Version

Pattern Stitch

Picot Single Crochet (Psc): insert hook into next st, yo, draw loop through, chain 3, yo, draw through both loops on hook.

Chain a multiple of 4

Row 1: ch 1, across, turn.

Row 2: ch 1, sc into first st, *Psc into next st, sc into next st; rep from * to end, turn.

Row 3: ch 1, sc into first and each st to end, turn.

Row 4: ch 1, sc into first 2 sts, *Psc into next st, sc into next st; rep from * to last st, sc into last st, turn.

repeat rows 1-4 until desired length is reached.

F is for Faun’s Eye

I’m actually REALLY excited about this stitch. I think it will be the PERFECT stitch for a fun throw and since I happen to be in need of a fun throw…..

What Is It?

Faun’s Eye stitch is a kind of lace that doesn’t have a ton of holes in it. Because it’s lace, there are a LOT of pieces to it. None of them are complicated, but there are a lot of things going on. I would NOT recommend trying to learn this stitch while you’re …say…watching your two young children (seriously, wait till nap time at least). To start though, cast on any multiple of 12 plus one. I’m working with 25 for now.

caston 25

Once that’s done, we’ll start row one by knitting the first stitch. Then follow this pattern: slip slip knit (decrease), knit three, yarn over (increase), knit one, yarn over (increase), knit three, knit two together (decrease) knit one. That is the 12 stitch pattern you’ll follow to the end of row one. It doesn’t look like much yet, but it’s the beginning of our lace pattern.

row 1

Row two starts similarly, but since we’re on the back, purl one to start. The work purl two together (decrease), purl 2, yarn over (increase), purl three, yarn over (increase), purl two, purl two together THROUGH THE BACK LOOP (decrease), purl one. Follow that to the end of the row and you’re done with row two.

Row 2

Now, I know that you all have reviewed my entry on increases and decreases already, but what is this through the back loop stuff? Well, it’s really easy and it works with ANY knit or purl stitch. This is the loop you generally work with.

this loop

And normally you would work through the “front” loop like this:

normally

When the instructions tell you to work through the BACK loop, you do the stitch exactly as you would, but you insert your needle in the other side of the loop, like this:

through the back loop

Notice that the needle comes in from the “right side” of the work toward the “wrong side” of the work (in this case).

So if you’re purling two together through the back loop (which effectively is the wrong side version of slip slip knit) it looks like this:

That was literally the most complicated stitch in the pattern. You should be proud of yourself for coming this far!

Now, because this is lace and is really a lot of “knit, yarn over knit two together” stuff that you already know, I’m going to skip the long explanation and just show you pictures of each row from here. We’ve done rows one and two already, here are the rest.

Row 3

Row 3

Row 4

Row 4

Row 5

Row 5

Row 6

Row 6

Row 7

Row 7

Row 8

row 8

Well done! Faun’s eye is super easy and fun and you’ve done a great job!

Fauns Eye

What Else Can You Do With It?

I think this would make a lovely sweater, throw, or accent pillow. If you’re bold and daring and have MASSIVE amounts of yarn, this would be an amazing candidate for Arm Knitting (check out Flax and Twine for a tutorial!).

This would also be a fun sweater or skirt embellishment and great for knitted curtains or a valance.

To work this stitch in the round,

Cast on a multiple of 12 sts

Round 1: *ssk, k3, yo, k1, yo, k3, k2tog, k1; rep from * to the end.

Round 2: * ssk, k2, yo, k3, yo, k2, k2tog, k1; rep from * to the end.

Round 3: *ssk, k1, yo, k5, yo, k1, k2tog, k1; rep from * to the end.

Round 4: *yo, ssk, p7, k2tog, yo, k1; rep from * to the end.

Round 5: *yo, k3, k2tog, k1, ssk, k3, yo, k1; rep from * to the end.

Round 6: K1, *yo, k2, ssk, k1, k2tog, k2, yo, k3; rep from *, end last rep k2.

Round 7: k2, *yo, k1, k2tog, k1, ssk, k1, yo, k5; rep from *, end last rep k3.

Round 8: k3, *k2tog, yo, k1, yo, ssk, k7; rep from *, end last rep k4.

The Short Version

Cast on a multiple of 12 sts + 1.

Row 1: k1, *ssk, k3, yo, k1, yo, k3, k2tog, k1; rep from * to end.

Row 2: p1, * p2tog, p2, yo, p3, yo, p2, p2tog tbl, p1; rep from * to the end of the row.

Row 3: k1, *ssk, k1, yo, k5, yo, k1, k2tog, k1; rep from * to the end of the row.

Row 4: p1, *yo, p2tog, p7, p2tog tbl, yo, p1; rep from * to the end of the row.

Row 5: k1, *yo, k3, k2tog, k1, ssk, k3, yo, k1; rep from * to the end of the row.

Row 6: p2, *yo, p2, p2tog, p1, p2tog tbl, p2, yo, p3; rep from *, to the last 12 sts, yo, p2, p2tog, p1, p2tog tbl, p2, yo, p2.

Row 7: k3, *yo, k1, k2tog, k1, ssk, k1, yo, k5; rep from *, to the last 12 sts, yo, k1, k2tog, k1, ssk, k1, yo, k3.

Row 8: p4, *p2tog tbl, yo, p1, yo, p2tog, p7; rep from *, to the last 12 sts, p2tog tbl, yo, p1, yo, p2tog, p4.

F is for Flag Stitch

F is yet another tricky letter. There are techniques that begin with F–fillet crochet, foundation single crochet (or ch/sc foundation),¬† and fan stitches come to mine. But there’s not a ton of actual pattern stitches that begin with F. Today though, F is for Flag Stitch.

What Is It?

I can’t help but think of Flag stitch as a funky way to work a treble crochet. It works almost like making two stitches in the same space, but you don’t add or lose any along the way because you skip every other stitch. It does create a great texture and there MIGHT just be another dishcloth pattern in the middle of this post….

Don’t let that distract you though! Chain any odd number to start with. Then single crochet a row to set up. If you want, you can work this step in one go, just take a look at the link above for foundation single crochet if you need the refresher. I worked 31 for today.

row 1

Chain four to start your next row, then we’ll get started on the flag stitch.

To begin the flag stitch (which we’ll be abbreviating flg in the short version), wrap the working yarn twice around your hook like you would for a treble crochet:

yo two

Insert your hook into the next stitch and draw up the loop.

draw up loop

Yarn over and draw through two (nice and familiar so far right?):

peg 1

Now the twist, do that again! Insert your hook into the same stitch, draw up the loop, yarn over and draw through two more loops. That’s the base of the stitch done.

Alright, can’t fool you, that’s too easy. So is this next part. Yarn over and draw through two, then yarn over and draw through the last two. You’ll have what appears to be the completed stitch.

Yeah, it’s not. Here is where things get a little hard to explain. You need to insert the hook into the top of the stitch. Specifically, the first set of two loops you worked off your needle AFTER you finished the base of the stitch. Work a single crochet in those loops and NOW you’re done.

You can see that the top has two “heads” as it were, making this a really fun way to sneak an increase in if you need it.

two heads

Since we don’t for now, to keep working, we’ll skip the next single crochet and keep working flags across.

When you get to the last stitch, treble (triple) crochet to finish the row. Then chain four to turn and start the next row of flags. Keep working until you have your very own flag museum–or until you’re happy with the length.

row 2

How Else Can You Use It?

Well, I said there might be a dishcloth pattern here…and there IS! I really like the texture on this stitch for a dishcloth and I need a new one anyway. Here’s the trick though, we’re going to be changing things up from the standard to get this to do what I want.

If you want a little more practice working this stitch before you follow me down the rabbit hole, it still works into a really nice dishcloth, just use a smaller hook (somewhere around E–3.5 mm or F–4.0mm) for standard kitchen cotton (which tends to be worsted–4). The smaller hook with this yarn will keep the gauge tighter and give you a nice texture for washing.

So, here’s what I did with it:

half cloth

Keep that chain 31 from our practice and single crochet across. Then chain four to turn and work a flag in every stitch, alternating between working the front loop and the back loop only. Triple crochet the last stitch and you should have this:

tree skirt

Another tip: If you make your foundation chain and work a flag in every stitch across rather than every other stitch, you’ll have doubled the amount of stitches you have to work with. That pulls the work into a bow shape or semi circle, so it’s a really fast and easy way to make a tree skirt if you need one.

Now to straighten the thing back out, chain one to turn and half double crochet two together across. You should have something that sort of sticks out on either side. Not quite like a bauble, but similar. I find that having that extra texture helps with the washing.

discloth row 3

Repeat the last two rows until you’re happy with the length and you’re good to go!

 

Flag Stitch Dishcloth

Materials: H hook, kitchen cotton (sugar and cream or similar)

Chain 31

Row 1: ch 1 to turn, Sc across (31 sts)

Row 2: Ch 4 (counts as first tr) turn, *flg in the front loop of next st, flg in the back loop of next st repeat from * to last st, tr.

Row 3: Ch1 to turn hdc2tog across.

Repeat row 2 and 3  three more times for a half wash cloth (pictured) or seven more times for a full wash cloth.

half cloth 2

The Short Version

Pattern Stitch

Flag Stitch (flg): yo twice, (insert hook into st, yo draw through loop, yo draw through 2 loops on hook) twice, (yo draw through two loops on hook) twice. Insert hook into previous two loops worked–not the two you JUST worked, but the two before those–yo draw through, yo draw through 2.

Chain any odd number

Row 1: sc across

Row 2: Ch 4 (counts as 1st tr) *flg in next st, sk 1 rep from *to last st, tr in last st

Repeat row 2 until desired length is reached.