Q is for Quilted Reverse Stockinette

I really want socks made out of this…something warm and thick and soft….I just think they would be super pretty…so today, Q is for Quilted Reverse Stockinette.

What Is It?

Well….That’s a good question….It’s sort of a closed diamond shaped mock cable stitch.

harry's opinion

Ok, Harry, you’re right…

Quilted Reverse Stockinette stitch is really what it says. It uses a slipped stitch passed over to create the look of a quilt with a background of reverse stockinette.

To begin, cast on any multiple of eight plus seven. I’m working with 23 today.

Knit one to kick off row one then begin the repeat section of slip one, knit four pass the slipped stitch over the four, and purl three. Work that repeat to the last six stitches, slip one, knit four, pass the slipped stitch over the four knits, and knit the last loop.

Qrow1

Now, we’ve worked that PSSO over two before. It’s the same concept working it over four, but it’s a little harder to keep all four knit stitches on the needle than it is to keep two on, so be CAREFUL not to drop your knit stitches when you’re passing that slipped stitch over and watch your tension. If your tension is too tight, you will not be able to get that slipped stitch over all four knits.

Row two starts with a knit one purl one and then repeats knit one, knit one in the running thread between the stitch you just made and the next stitch, knit one, purl five.

you-want-me-to-do-what

That was me too for a couple minutes, so I took some photos for you (I guess it’s meme day today). Start with your knit one. Then make one using the strand from row one then knit the next stitch.

Effectively you’re making up for the slipped stitch so you don’t lose stitches across your pattern.

qrow2

Row three and four are both very similar and very easy. Row three starts off  by knitting two, then repeats knit three, purl five across to the last five stitches where you’ll purl three and knit two. Row four takes that and basically mirrors it, but starting with a knit one purl one, and repeating knit three purl five across to the last five where you’ll knit three and purl one knit one.

qrow4

Row five is pretty much row one again. Start by knitting two then begin the repeat: purl three, move your yarn to the back for knitting, slip one, knit four, pass the slipped stitch over the four. End row five by purling three and knitting two. Remember here, just like before to be careful with your tension so you can get that slipped stitch over the four knits.

qrow 5

Row six begins by knitting one, then repeat purl five, knit one, make one in the slip stitch from row 5, knit one until the last six stitches. To end the row, purl five and knit one.

qrow6

Row seven and eight are almost mirrors of each other just like three and four were. For seven, knit one, then repeat knit five, purl three until the last six and knit the last six. For row eight, knit one, then purl five knit three to the last six stitches and purl five then knit one.

q row 8

And that’s it! See, it wasn’t hard at all! Now you can repeat it a few times and make some socks!

q done

What Else Can You Do With It?

I REALLY like the idea of this stitch as socks (did I mention that already?). I think it would also be fun for a baby blanket or pillow cover. It would make a nice sweater or scarf as well.

However, since I am all about the socks, let’s look at how to work this in the round. The pattern always ends and begins with a knit stitch, so it’s really easy to alter for working in a round. Just cut one knit one off the end of each row and you’ve got it!

I think these may be easier to work top down rather than toe up, but I seriously think I’ve just found my traveling project.

The Short Version

(multiple of 8 sts plus 7)
Row 1 (RS) K1, *sl 1, k4, pass sl st over the 4 k sts, p3; rep from *to last 6 sts, sl1, k4, pass sl st over the 4 k sts, k1.
Row 2 K1, p1, *k1, m1 in sl st from row 1, k1, p5; rep from *, end p1, k1.
Row 3 K2, *p3, k5; rep from *, end p3, k2.
Row 4 K1, p1, *k3, p5; rep from *, end k3, p1, k1.
Row 5 K2, *p3, wyib sl 1, k4, pass sl st over 4 k sts; rep from *, end p3, k2.
Row 6 K1, *p5, k1, m1 in sl st from row 5, k1; rep from *, end p5, k1.
Row 7 K1, *k5, p3; rep from *, end k6.
Row 8 K1, *p5, k3, rep from *, end p5, k1.
Rep rows 1-8.

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Q is for Quahog Shells

I needed something unique for today. So I popped onto Crochet Kitten’s Blogspot and found out that today, Q would be for Quahog Shells.

What is it?

First, what’s a Quahog? No, not just a made up word like my son says, A quahog is another name for a round clam.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Click here for more information on the photographer of this. It wasn’t me.

 

To start, chain any multiple of eight plus three more, I’ll be working 16 today.

To begin row one, you may want to mark the last chain in your foundation so you don’t lose your place. Chain six to count as your first double crochet and a three chain. If you marked your foundation chain, you should be able to see the last chain in the foundation and count three to skip very easily. If you didn’t mark your foundation chain, you’ll still skip three of the foundation chains and double crochet in the 10th chain from the hook. Double crochet in the next four chains to make a “shell” of five double crochets.

Chain three and skip three chains, then work five double crochets across the next five chains. Repeat that across to the last four chains, then chain three, skip three chains and work a double crochet in the last chain.

Qrow 1

You can already see that unlike other shell stitches, Quahog Shells are not as round. This is because the double crochets are grouped across five chains rather than being all in one chain. Technically this means it is NOT a shell, but I’m gonna roll with it this time because we’re talking stitches, not techniques.

Row two is going to be your set up row for this pattern and is sort of a mock foundation chain it’s self. Start by chaining one and turning your work. Then single crochet in the first double crochet you made (remember, turning chain ones fall out side of the pattern and are ignored for counting).

Chain three and skip three stitches, then single crochet in the next double crochet. Repeat that across to the last four stitches again and then chain three, skip three and work a single crochet in the top of the chain that counted as the first double crochet for row one.

Qrow 2

Now that we have the set up done, row three will be almost identical to row one, except you’ll be working your sets of five double crochets in a chain three space rather than working across five stitches (which leans this stitch back toward being a true shell).

Chain six to start the row (again, this counts as one double crochet and a chain three space) and skip the first chain three space. In the NEXT chain three space, work five double crochets, chain three and skip three. Repeat that sentence across to the last single crochet and double crochet in the single crochet.

Qrow 3

Repeat rows two and three until you’re happy with the length and you know how to make the Quahog Shell stitch!

Q done

What Else Can You Do With It?

Quahog Shell is a fun lacy stitch to work up quickly. It get’s to be a mindless stitch (which is a GOOD THING for this busy mom who needs a break from time to time!!) and that makes it a good “telly watching” stitch. That also makes it a great stitch to teach those who are new to crochet or to shells in general.

I think this stitch would make a very fun blanket in a super chunky yarn or a lacy beach cover up in a sport weight yarn. It would also work well for a skirt to go over leggings or as a cardigan.

If you want to get a little bit different look, off set the shells by working as follows:

Row 3: Ch 3(counts as 1 dc), 4dc in first ch 3 sp, *ch 3, skip next ch-3 sp, 5 dc in next ch-3 sp; rep from * across to last ch 3 sp, 4dc in ch 3 sp, dc in last sc.

Row 4: rep row 2

Row 5: Ch 6 (counts as 1 dc and 3 ch), skip 1st ch-3 sp, *5 dc in next ch-3 sp, ch 3, skip next ch-3 sp; rep from * across to last sc. Dc in last sc.

repeat rows 2-5

IMG_20180412_095801_883

The Short Version

Foundation chain: Multiple of 8+3

Row 1: Ch 6 (counts as 1st dc and ch 3) Dc in 10th ch from hook and next 4 ch, *ch 3, skip next 3 ch, dc in next 5 ch; rep from * across to last 4 ch. Ch 3, skip next 3 ch, dc in last ch.

Row 2: Ch 1; turn. Sc in 1st dc, *ch 3, skip next 3 sts, sc in next dc, rep from * across to last 4 sts, ch 3, sc in 4th ch of turning chain.

Row 3: Ch 6 (counts as 1 dc and 3 ch), skip 1st ch-3 sp, *5 dc in next ch-3 sp, ch 3, skip next ch-3 sp; rep from * across to last sc. Dc in last sc.

Rep rows 2 & 3 until you want to clam up….

P is for Portcullis

Every time I hear the word “portcullis”, I think of the Princess Bride when they yell for Fezzik to stop the portcullis from coming down and locking them out of the castle. So in honor of one of my favorite book-turned-movies, today P is for Portcullis.

What Is It?

Portcullis stitch is a relatively simple lace stitch that reminds me of a tighter Netted Stitch. You start off my casting on any multiple of four plus two more. I’ll work twenty two today (bit of a tongue twister, but we’ll work with it).

portcullis caston

Purl across to finish row one quickly.

port 1

To start row two, knit two together (we have a lot of twos going on today….) then begin the repeat section. In the next stitch, work knit one, yarn over, knit one.

k1yok1 samest

Then, slip one, knit two together, and pass the slipped stitch over the decrease.

Repeat those two steps to the last three stitches. Work the knit one, yarn over, knit one again and then slip slip knit to finish the row.

row 2 port

And that’s it. Repeat those two rows until you’re done fighting the brute squad.

portcullis

What Else Can  You Do With It?

Like netted stitch, Portcullis stitch is a simple, quick lace stitch that is easy to work in a round and works well for beach bags, curtains, table cloths, or pillow covers.When working this stitch in the round, you’ll want to work a multiple of four and omit the extra two.

I think that this stitch would make some very fun bell sleeves on a summer cover up or sweater.

The Short Version

Cast on a multiple of 4 sts+ 2
Row 1: P across
Row 2: K2tog, *(k1, yo, k1) in the same st, sl 1-k2tog-psso; rep from *to last three sts, (k1, yo, k1) in the same st, ssk.

 

 

We’re Moving!

Those of you who have been following me on Instagram already know, but I thought it was time for a “real” update on the move situation.

In March, my husband and I started to look at building a home, but there really isn’t a lot of land to put such a home on in our area and we have no interest in leaving central Texas, so we started looking at the used home market and found a couple that we really liked. There have been a LOT of ups and downs, but as of May, we have contracts executed to sell our house as well as buy a new house not far from where we really wanted to be.

For us, this move is a HUGE adventure! We’ve moved lots of times, even a couple of times with a less than one year old baby (my first son), but we’ve never moved with two active, wiggling toddlers! We aren’t going far, but the change can be hard. I will be spending a LOT of time with my older son helping him understand that leaving this house is a change, not a loss and a LOT of time packing.

I’ll be writing blog posts in advance so we can finish the ABC series as close to on time as possible, but if I miss a week, please forgive me.

There is also another announcement I would like to make, but it is currently dependent on how Etsy chooses to carry out their changes to the “Finances” section of their seller’s website.

Etsy recently announced that they would be making some changes to how fees and taxes are collected that would effect how I am able to run my shop there. Etsy is notorious for making these kinds of announcements and then shifting something so that the actual effects are not quite the same, so I am waiting to see.

What I CAN say for now is that coming soon there will be some changes to the shop (one way or this other), and I am working on a surprise for you all for middle end of next year (hopefully sooner, but we’ll see) so stick with me till then at least!

Thank you all for reading, sharing, and learning with me!

Natalie

P is for Pineapple

This stitch is an oldie but a goody. It’s really easy and fun to work. Today, P is for Pineapple!

7207322_f520_medium

Photo from Ravelry © Moira Durano-Abesmo get her free patterns here

What Is It?

Now, don’t confuse Pineapple stitch with Pineapple LACE. They are VERY different. Pineapple Lace is a gorgeous MOTIF that you can use in all sorts of applications from blankets to dresses and beyond. It looks like this:

img_6865

And Craftsy (from whom the picture came) has  great “how to” on the subject. I am including the instructions for Pineapple Lace as a BONUS Short Version, but not going into it here.

The Pineapple Stitch is a vintage stitch that is amazingly simple and works easily in a round. This stitch really is a single crochet two together, but you’re not actually decreasing with it. To get started, chain any even number. I’m working with 20 today.

chain

Insert your hook into the third chain from the hook and draw the yarn through the chain.

insert into 3rd chain

Skip the next chain and insert your hook into the following chain and draw the yarn through the stitch.

insert 2

Then yarn over and draw through all three loops on the hook.

one pineapple

Chain one and then insert your hook into the same chain as the last loop you drew up and draw up a loop.

insert for next

Skip the next chain and insert your hook into the following chain again. Then draw the yarn through to have three loops on your hook again.

and again

Draw through all three loops again. Chain one and repeat that process across the foundation chain then fasten off the yarn.

row 1 pineapple

Yeah, cut it. This stitch is worked right to left only and there’s really no way to go backward like some of the stitches we’ve worked on. The GOOD news is that if you’re working in the round, you don’t have to cut it here, just start row two–which we’ll start now.

Join the yarn in the top of the chain from the previous row.

start row 2

Chain three, draw loops through the first and second spaces from the previous row. Make sure to use the space between the chain and the first “stitch” as your first space or you’ll lose a stitch.

add pineapples

Draw a loop through the last space used and the next space and then through all three loops on the hook and repeat that across to finish row two.

row 2 pineapple

Break the yarn and just repeat row two as many times as you need. Again, if you’re working in the round skip the cutting of the yarn and just move on to the next round.

pineapple done

What Else Can You Do With It?

Work it in the round!! This stitch really is best for working in a round because you don’t waste as much yarn. That’s not to say you can’t work it flat, especially if you’re going to be switching colors every row anyway it can be very pretty and fun to work.

This stitch is a fun book bag or striped mat. It’s also a really good stitch to use for making a wreath if you don’t want to use amigurumi or if you want to wrap an existing wreath.

The Short Version

Chain any even number

Row 1: Draw yarn through 3rd stitch from hook, skip 1 chain, draw through next chain and draw through the 3 loops on hook; chain 1. *Draw loop through the same stitch as last loop, skip 1 chain, draw through next chain, draw through the 3 loops on hook; chain 1. Repeat from * to end of row. Break off.

Row 2: Fasten yarn through chain of previous row; chain 4. Draw loop through 1st st, through 2nd st, through the 3 loops on hook; chain 1. *Draw loop through space last used, through next space, through 3 loops on hook; chain 1. Repeat from * to end of row. Break off.

Repeat row 2.

The BONUS Short Version: Pineapple Lace Stitch

Chain 4

Row 1: dc in fourth ch from hook. Ch 2, 2 dc in same sp, ch 4, turn

Row 2: 12 tr in ch-2 space Ch 4,turn.

Row 3: *Ch 1, tr rep from * all the way across for a total of 12 ch-1 spaces. Turn

Row 4: *Ch 3, sc in ch-1 space. Repeat from * all the way across for a total of 12 ch-3 spaces. Turn your work

Row 5: Skip the first ch-3 space. *Ch 3, sc in next ch-3 space. Repeat from * all the way across for a total of 11 ch-3 spaces. Turn your work.

Row 6-15: Repeat row 5, skipping the first ch-3 space at the beginning of each row so you have a shorter row than the row previous.

Fasten off, weave in ends.

O is for Oyster Stitch

Since the last stitch was so easy, lets take on a bit of a challenge. Today, O is for Oyster Stitch.

What is it?

Oyster Stitch is similar to Horseshoe Crab Stitch in that it looks arguably like the animal it is named for. If you don’t know what an oyster looks like off hand, here’s a picture:

pacific-oyster-57652_1920

Yeah, they’re not much to look at on the outside, but that is the general shape we’ll be working with, so let’s get started. First, cast on a multiple of six plus seven. I’m going to cast on 25.

The first row is easy, so I’ll skip it. Just knit across. The SECOND row gets a little more interesting. Purl one to get started (a real oyster would pearl, but we can be punny later), then we’re going to work a double wrap purl. Insert your hook to purl like normal, then wrap the yarn around the needle twice. This will create the illusion of two stitches on the needle when you’re done.

Work four more of those and then purl one. Work five double wrap purls and one regular purl across to the last stitch, then purl one more and get ready for row 3.

row 2 oyster

Knit one to start row 3 and then work an Oyster. What’s an Oyster? Slip the next five stitches onto your working needle and drop the extra wrap (those double wrap purls allowed us to make nice long stitches for our Oyster cluster).

sl 5

Then, slip all five back on to your holding needle

return 5

Now, just like our double wrap purls from before, we’re going to work a set of knit one, purl one, knit one, purl one, knit one all double wrapped. All of that is going to be worked in ALL FIVE loops together (the loops we just shifted).

 

You’ll have to keep inserting your needle into the same space to get all that done, but there should be enough room because of the double wrap purls from row three. When you’re done, it should look something like this:

Oyster st

Knit on and then work another Oyster and repeat that across.

row 3oyster

Purl one to start row four, then knit five dropping the extra wraps just like before and purl one. Repeat that knit five purl one combo across and you’re done with row four.

row 4 oyster

Row five is the same as row one, just knit across. This will also be the setup for our pattern repeat. The second half of the pattern is the same as the first, but it’s offset, so for row six, start off by purling four rather than one and then work the same repeat as row two (five double wrapped purls, purl one) until the last three and purl those last three.

rose 5 oyster

Following suit, row seven starts off with four knits rather than one and is the same as row three until those last three stitches that you knit.

row 6 oyster

Again, row eight starts with four purls and then works the same as row four until those last three where you purl again. You’ve probably noticed by now, but it’s very common for offset patterns like this one to have the same things going on put shift the knits and purls at the beginning or end of the row (or both!). The shift of the stitches at the beginning and end is what allows the pattern to be offset at all.

row 8 oyster

Now that you’re done with row 8, that’s it! Repeat it a few times or a hundred and enjoy your new, beautiful oysters!

Oyster

What Else Can You Do With It?

As much as I’m trying to hype this up as a challenge, Oyster stitch is really very easy and a fun way to practice wrapped lace stitches. It is a great tension teacher and can really help you to practice and define your tension as you knit.

Aside from all the learning benefits of this stitch, it knitting two rows to start it off and knitting two rows at row 5 and then stopping is a good way to make a knitted ribbon. Oyster can be a fun panel or edging for a sweater or skirt. It’s a great throw in a worsted or chunky yarn or a boarder for a blanket. It can also knit up into a fun sweater. Try working the double wrap stitches in a contrasting yarn for a colorful variation of this stitch!

The Short Version

Multiples of 6 + 7

Oyster 5: Slip next 5 stitches to working needle dropping extra wraps, slip them back to holding needle, (k1,p1,k1,p1,k1) into all 5 stitches tog, wrapping yarn twice around needle for each stitch.

Note: be sure to bring yarn between the needle points (not over needle) for each st when working (k1,p1,k1,p1,k1) into all 5 sts tog.

Row 1: Knit across.

Row 2: P1, *p5, wrapping yarn twice around needle for each st, p1; rep from * across.

Row 3: K1, *Oyster 5, k1; rep from * across.

Row 4: P1, *k5, dropping extra wraps, p1; rep from * across.

Row 5: Knit across.

Row 6: P4, *p5, wrapping yarn twice around needle for each st, p1; rep from * to last 3 sts, p3.

Row 7: K4, *Oyster 5, k1; rep from * to last 3 sts, k3.

Row 8: P4, *k5, dropping extra wraps, p1; rep from * to last 3 sts, p3.

Repeat rows 1-8 until they close the Oyster Bar.

O is for Open Hexagons

First this comes first with this post: it’s my baby’s first birthday!!! Happy birthday sweet boy!!!

Ok, now to the real post, I found this while I was wandering around the internet on little blogspot called Engineered Crochet. If you are a designer I SERIOUSLY encourage you to check it out. She talks through her process for each project and is kind enough to share her patterns as well! If you’re just here for the stitch, then today, O is for Open Hexagons by Sarah of Engineered Crochet.

What Is It?

Open Hexagons is a fun lace stitch that was created by an Chemical Engineering student a few years ago. I know how much work can go into designing something like this, so I thought it would be a nice thing to spread her hard work to you all! I did update the pattern slightly to be a little clear and more consistent with standard patterns, however I left most of it as is. You may notice that the pattern repeats don’t finish neatly and expect you to understand that the last repeat of the pattern is a partial repeat. This is a common feature of free online patterns and I want you all to see that here too so that you can learn to understand some of these patterns better and learn how to reason out what’s going on with them.

Hopefully learning about these less literal patterns here will help some of you to open up a whole new world of patterns online (for free even!) and to grow your understanding of crochet in general. If you have trouble with how the pattern is written here, PLEASE contact me and I will walk you through it.

We’ll start by chaining a multiple of 6 plus 2, I’ll be working 26 and a smaller gauge today to give a better effect for this stitch. This stitch does work for a larger gauge, but I LOVE this red that I found in my scraps bin (thanks Mem!) and I was struggling to get the right tension with a larger hook on this one.

Anyway, once you have your chain done, we’re going to single crochet in the second chain from the hook (think of that as your chain one turning chain and then single crochet into the next one). Skip two chains, work five double crochets in the next chain, skip two chains and single crochet in the next chain. Work that across and you have row one done!

row 1

Now, I’m going to pause here to explain what just happened with that row because it is very important to understand if you’re going to fall in love with shells. First and foremost, what we just did there was make a five double crochet shell. This is a relatively common stitch in shell work. The single crochets on either side of the five double crochets hold the shell down and help to give it the shape that it’s so famous for. The chain two that we skipped is space so that the shell will lay down flat and fan out at the top. If you want a bunched shell or if you want to give your work a three dimensional effect, you can work both of those chains and the group of five will stick out like a beautiful (and hopefully NOT sore) thumb!

Row two is going to begin our open work hexagons. First, chain three (which will count as your first double always in this pattern) and work two more double crochets in the last single crochet of row one. These three will work to be “half” of your five double crochet shell and start off your row. When working with shell, “half” shells will often be the beginning and the end of every other row. Skip two (so your shell can lay down) and and we’ll start our pattern repeat. Work one single crochet into the  center double crochet of the shell from row one, chain two, skip the rest of the shell (two double crochets), double crochet in the single crochet, chain two, skip two single crochet in the center double crochet of the shell (that’s the end of the open work part of the repeat), skip two (to give our shell some space) work five double crochets in the next single crochet and repeat that across.

Now, you all are smart enough to figure this out, but just to be clear, when you get to the LAST repeat for this row, you do NOT want to work five double crochets into that last single crochet, you want to work a “half” shell which is three double crochets ONLY. This will keep the edge of your work flat and keep you from having some awkward turning chains along the way.

row 2

Row three is the second part if our open work and it will start with a chain one (to help you turn the work–if you don’t need it, don’t use it) and a single crochet into the last double crochet from row two. Then we get to our repeat, skip two, and work three double crochets in the single crochet on row two, chain two, skip two, single crochet in the center double crochet of the open work on row two, chain two, skip two, three more double crochets in the single crochet, skip two and single crochet in the center double crochet of the shell on row two (are you seeing the theme here?). Work that across your row and row three is done.

row 3

Remember: when you’re working a chain one to turn you ignore that chain on the next row. So, ignore the turning chain and work row two one more time to complete row four.

row 4

Row five is effectively row one over again, so I’m going to go over much of it here. Just like row one, row five is a set up row of shells to get you ready for another set of openwork. Rather obviously you’re not working in chains for this row, so in “The Short Version” this row is re-written to reflect the changes. For the long version, I’m just going to say: work row one and you’re done with row five!

row 5

Now that we’re all set up, we can start row six which is almost identical to row two except that they’re offset from each other. Chain three and work two double crochets in the first single crochet to make your “half” shell. The repeat portion is to skip two, single crochet, skip two, work five double crochets, skip two, single crochet, chain two, skip two, double crochet, and chain two. Just like row two, when you get to that last single crochet work another “half” shell of three double crochets.

row 6

Just like row six is basically row two, row seven is basically row three, but again, it’s the offset version. Chain one to help with turning (if you need it) and single crochet in the first double crochet. Then skip two to help your shell and work five double crochets in the next single crochet. Now we’ll start the repeat part, skip two, single crochet, skip two, work three double crochets in the single crochet, chain two, skip two, single crochet in the double crochet, chain two, skip two, work three double crochets in the single crochet and work that to the last double crochet. Single crochet in the last double crochet and you’re done with row seven.

row 7

The last two rows are just repeats. For row eight, repeat row six to finish up the open work section.

row 8

For row nine, repeat row five to set up for starting the pattern over.

row 9

Repeat rows two to nine for the full pattern and stop at EITHER row five or row nine. This pattern is nice and gives you some options, just remember that you shouldn’t stop your pattern EXCEPT at row five or row nine unless you want to end on an openwork row and have a partial hexagon.

What Else Can You Do With It?

open hex

This stitch was made to explore the idea of taking a netted open work stitch and making it at least partially solid using a shell pattern. I think it would be a fun replacement for any solid shell stitch that could stand some holes.

It would also be a good beach cover up or bag, a fun market bag, throw, or valance (the curtain that looks like bangs on kitchen windows among others). It might make fun stockings as well. Be creative with it!

The Short Version

Chain a multiple of 6 + 2
Row 1: sc in 2nd ch from hook, *sk 2, dc 5 in next ch, sk 2, sc in next ch rep from * across, turn.

Row 2: ch 3 (counts as first dc here and throughout),  dc 2 in first sc, sk 2, *sc in dc, ch 2, sk 2, dc in sc, ch 2 sk 2, sc in dc, sk 2, 5 dc in sc rep from *to last sc, 3 dc in last sc, turn.

Row 3: ch 1 sc in dc, *sk 2, dc 3 in sc, ch 2 , sk 2, sc in dc, ch 2, sk 2, dc 3 in sc, sk 2, sc in dc rep from * across, turn.

Row 4: repeat row 2.

Row 5: ch 1, sc in dc, *sk 2, 5 dc in sc, sk 2, sc in dc rep from * across, turn.

Row 6: ch 3, 2 dc in first sc, *sk 2, sc in dc, sk 2, 5 dc in sc, sk 2, sc in dc, ch 2, sk 2, dc in sc, ch 2 rep from * to last sc, 3 dc in last sc, turn.

Row 7: ch 1, sc in dc, sk 2, 5 dc in sc, *sk 2, sc in dc, sk 2, 3 dc in sc, ch 2, sk 2, sc in dc, ch 2, sk 2, 3 dc in sc rep from * across, sc in last dc, turn.

Row 8 : repeat Row 6

Row 9: repeat Row 5

Repeat Rows 2-9 for pattern, ending with either row 5 or row 9.

N is for Netted Stitch

Who’s ready for something easy? There’s been a LOT going on around here, so I think I am. Let’s have a nice easy stitch. Today, N is for Netted Stitch.

What Is It?

Netted stitch is one of the simplest and quickest knitting stitches that I can think of. There’s only one row and it works up super quick. Netted Stitch uses a series of increases and decreases to create a….well….netted look.  First, cast on any even number of stitches. I’ll work 20 today.
netted cast on

Now, the first stitch and the last stitch are going to be knit, so as far as our pattern goes, they’re “extras” that will hold the panel together. Remember that if your working this into something else or working in the round (more on that in a minute).

Knit the first stitch then start the pattern repeat, yarn over, knit two together and work that repeat across to the last stitch. Knit the last stitch and you’re done!

netted cast on

Repeat it for even just a few rows and you can see how it already is looking like a net.

netted sttich

What Else Can You Do With It?

Netted stitch is easy to work in the round which makes it a great choice for a beachcomber bag! The weave is a little too loose for a standard purse, but it does make a nice bit of lace for a pillow cover or table cloth, or curtains.

A really fun project to do with this stitch is to make a panel of netted stitch knitting in white or cream and then embroider into the netting. The holes are large enough that the fabric can be used with a plastic yarn needle to teach kids to sew, cross stitch, or embroider without having to buy a special kit.

The Short Version

Cast on any even number

Row 1: k1, *yarn over,  k2tog, repeat from * to last stitch, k1

Repeat row 1 to desired length, width, or height.

N is for Norman Arch

It’s time for something that works up big and quick without bulky yarn. Today, N is for Norman Arch.

What Is It?

Norman Arch is a sort of lace stitch that has a solid arch in the middle of it. To start, chain any multiple of 9 plus one. I’ll be working 19 today.

chain 19 arch

Chain one to turn and start row one (remember this chain is ignored throughout the pattern and is only used to facilitate turning if you don’t need it, don’t use it). Row one will have a flat (chain three) and arches (chain seven) then has two flats back to back (chain three, single crochet, chain three) and an arch and so on. The flat areas will be space for the double crochets on the arch to lay in.

Moving on, single crochet into the second chain from the hook (or the 19th foundation chain), skip the next three chains and single crochet into the next chain. Chain seven to serve as your arch and single crochet into the next chain. Chain three, skip three chains and single crochet into the next chain. Repeat that to the end and you’ve finished row one.

norman 1

Row two is really very easy, chain one to turn (again, we’ll be ignoring that chain and if  you don’t need it, don’t bother), then single crochet into the first stitch, skip that chain three and work thirteen double crochets into the chain seven space (if 13 bothers you, you can use 11 or 15 instead, just make sure it’s an odd number) to make the arch.

arch

Skip the next chain three so the arch has some space and single crochet into the next stitch. Then skip the next chain three and make your next arch, repeating that pattern to the end and single crocheting into the last stitch.

norman 2

NEW STITCH ALERT!!

Row three will start with a chain of 6 that counts at a Double Treble Crochet…

you-want-me-to-do-what

Don’t worry, it’s not hard, just a lot of wrapping. I’m sure you all remember the treble crochet from some of our first lessons, the double treble crochet is almost identical to that, we’re just going to wrap the yarn around three times rather than two.

dtr wraps

Then insert the hook into the stitch you’re working and yarn over and pull through the stitch.

insert yarn over dtr

Yarn over and pull through two loops on the hook until you only have one loop on the hook.

You should be left with a unicorn horn worthy twist of yarn that we call the double treble crochet (or dtr for short).

unicorn worthy

So, you should have your chain six already to count as your double treble crochet, skip the next five double crochets on the arch and double crochet in the 6th double crochet on the arch. Chain three and double crochet in the next double crochet, twice. Skip the next 11 stitches and repeat that again (starting in the 6th double crochet of the next arch). When you get to the last six stitches, skip five of them and work a double treble crochet into the last stitch (skipping that turning chain).

Norman 3

The next two rows are really a way to get back to a flat base to start your arch from. This would be a great place to play around with stitches and work anything that you’d like as long as you have a relatively even row to start your next arch from.

As the pattern is written though, row four starts with a chain three (counting as a double crochet) and works in the chains from the last row. Skip the first double crochet and across the next chain three, double crochet, chain one double crochet. Chain three and then repeat that work across the next chain three from row three. Skip the next two double crochets and start on the next arch. When you get to the end of the row, skip the last double crochet and double crochet in the top of the chain six from row three.

Norman 4

Row five is the last row in this pattern and is the set up row for the next set of arches. Chain six (this time to count as a double crochet and a chain three), just like row one, the chain three flats on this row will only be used to give some space for the arches. Skip the first chain one space and in the chain 3 space single crochet, chain seven, and single crochet again. Chain three and skip the next chain one space, then double crochet in the space BETWEEN the two double crochets on roe four to bridge the arches:

dc in sp

Chain three more and repeat that, ending by double crocheting in the double treble crochet at the end of the row.

Norman 5

And that’s it. Work a few more sets to have the fastest blanket in the west…or east..or wherever.

Norman Arch

What Else Can You Do With It?

Norman Arch is an amazingly quick stitch. It would be a great edging on a tunic top, or a skirt for summer beach wear. It’s a fast blanket or scarf and when used in the right gauge is a beautifully delicate lace.

You can even use it for some unusual things like a mask, a lace panel for a blouse or jewelry!

The Short Version

Abbreviations: dtr–double treble crochet

Multiple of 9 sts + 1.

Row 1: (Wrong Side): ch 1 to turn, sc into 2nd ch from hook, *ch 3, skip 3 ch, sc into next ch, ch7 , sc into next ch, ch 3, skip 3 ch, sc into next ch; rep from * to end, turn.

Row 2: ch 1 to turn, sc into first st, *skip 3 ch, work 13 dc into next 7 ch arch, skip 3 ch, sc into next st; rep from * to end, skip tch, turn.

Row 3: ch 6 (count as dtr) skip next 5 dc, *[dc into next dc, ch 3] twice, dc into next dc, skip next 11 sts; rep from * to last arch, [dc into next dc, ch 3] twice, dc into next dc, skip next 5 dc, dtr into last sc, skip tch, turn.

Row 4: ch 3 (count as dc), skip next dc, *dc into next ch, ch 1, skip 1 ch, dc into next ch, ch 3 , skip the next dc, dc into next ch, ch 1, skip 1 ch, dc into next ch, skip next 2dc; rep from * to last arch, dc into next ch, ch 1, skip 1 ch, dc into next ch, ch 3 , skip the next dc, dc into next ch, ch 1, skip 1 ch, dc into next ch, skip next dc, dc into top of tch, turn.

Row 5: ch 6 (count as 1dc and 3ch), *in next ch 3 sp, work [sc, ch 7, sc], ch 3, skip next ch 1 sp, dc between next 2dc, ch 3; rep from * to last arch, in next ch 3 sp, work [sc, ch 7, sc], ch 3, skip next ch 1 sp, dc into top of tch, turn.

Repeat rows 2-5 until you have a plethora of arches.